Authors

Sam Dillemans, AuthorsSam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors
Hardcover, 222 pp., offset 4/4, 250 x 325 mm
English and Dutch
Edition of 2000
ISBN 978-94-9069-399-2
Published by MER. Paper Kunsthalle

$52.00 · add to cart

In the past years Sam Dillemans has painted some 300 portraits, mostly of influential writers, but also of scientists, composers and singers. In his typical dynamic and fluent style Dillemans completed the 300 portraits almost in one go. Most of the portraits are painted in black and white with smooth, volatile lines; others are touched up with some rare subtle brushstrokes in colour. Whether the subject is recognizable or not depends on the viewer and on how much the artists is prepared to divulge in his impressive paintings. On the occasion of the exhibition that opened on April 19th in the Castle of Gaasbeek, the paintings of the series Authors have been collected in the eponym book, which was published on the opening day of the exhibition by MER. Paper Kunsthalle.

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Sam Dillemans, Authors

Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In NonsenseMichael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense
Softcover, 208 pp., offset 4/4, 220 x 270 mm
Edition of 2000
ISBN 978-94-9069-363-3
Published by MER. Paper Kunsthalle

$39.00 · add to cart

This book, Michael Fullerton’s first monograph, and the artist’s work is concerned with how political and historical information is recorded and disseminated, in particular through the medium of the oil painted portrait. Other mediums of communication, such as billboard posters, wall texts and the raw materials used for analogue tape and audio recording are also employed. Fullerton’s choice of subjects range from the overtly political to people of varied social class and unexpected cultural histories. Underpinning Fullerton’s work is an examination of the relationships between people and the forces at play in those relationships, whether that be social relations involving authority or power, or relationship dynamics that work on a more emotional, psychological or aesthetic level.

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

Michael Fullerton, Pleasure In Nonsense

From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di GenkLuciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk
Hardcover, 56 pp. + DVD, offset 4/4, 170 x 220 mm
Edition of 800
ISBN 978-94-9069-362-6
Published by MER. Paper Kunsthalle

$32.00 · add to cart

Between 1990 and 2007, Italian artist Luciano Fabro (1936-2007) created sixteen publicly commissioned works. This book, along with an accompanying dvd, focuses on the life and works of this extraordinary artist, and brings homage to Fabro’s latest realization La Colonna di Genk. This intriguing work commissioned by the city of Genk (B) visibly illustrates Fabro’s way of thinking and creation process. The accompanying dvd reveals biographical elements as well as the making of and the festive inauguration of La Colonna during Labour Day on May the 1st 2008. The inauguration took place on the renewed Genk Stadsplein (B), just ten months prior to Fabro’s death.

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

Luciano Fabro, From Contratto Sociale to Colonna di Genk

From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public PoemAlain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem
Softcover, 80 pp., offset 4/1, 165 x 245 mm
Edition of 2000
ISBN 978-94-9069-315-2
Published by MER. Paper Kunsthalle

$32.00 · add to cart

Alain Arias-Misson created the “Public Poem” 45 years ago in Brussels and Madrid when he decided “to write on the street like a page.” From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem gives a graphic account of this always disruptive urban poet — from the Place St.-Germain in Paris to the Sixtine Chapel in the Vatican and Madison Square Garden in New York City.

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

Alain Arias-Misson, From the Cutting-Floor of the Public Poem

After Empire

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After EmpireHerman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire
Softcover, 256 pp., offset 1/1, 110 x 180 mm
Edition of 2000
ISBN 978-94-9069-394-7
Published by MER. Paper Kunsthalle

$20.00 · add to cart

After Empire is published on the occasion of the group show ‘Blijven Kijken’, an exhibition curated by Pieter Van Bogaert at M-Museum on (dis)appearing images and the boundaries of representation. Central in the exhibition is the 2010 video After Empire by Herman Asselberghs. This video is a tentative reflection on positive forms of collective resistance against war as well as emancipatory representations concerned with it. This publication considers a possible alternative for an iconic image drawn from our collective memory: a hijacked plane hitting the second tower of the WTC in 2001, New York. The book proposes an alternative for our collective history: the 15th of February 2003. On that day 30 million citizens across the planet marched against the unilateral decision by the American government to start a pre-emptive war against Iraq under the auspices of “the war on terrorism”. 2/15 was the greatest peace demonstration since the Vietnam war and probably the biggest protest march ever to take place. The war did happen, but this world day of resistance could very well mark the beginning of the 21st century. 2/15 instead of 9/11: a key date in the writing of a history of global contestation in the struggle between two superpowers: the United States against public opinion worldwide.

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire

Herman Asselberghs and Dieter Lesage, After Empire

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013
Softcover, 228 pp. + three special inserts, offset 4/4, 220 x 287 mm
English edition
ISSN 2038-4807
Published by KALEIDOSCOPE Press

$12.00 · add to cart

KALEIDOSCOPE Issue 18 (summer 2013), highlighting Andra Ursuta, Shanzhai Biennial, Sergei Tcherepnin, Yngve Holen and Petrit Halilaj; investigating an updated notion of materiality; exploring the curatorial practice of Massimiliano Gioni; featuring our regulars, tips, and three special inserts.

HIGHLIGHTS
The issue’s opening section of HIGHLIGHTS features Andra Ursuta, whose practice is understood by Joanna Fiduccia as committed to annihilating sculpture’s distance from our world; the fashion-label-cum-art-project Shanzhai Biennial, whose tangible products, explains Kevin McGarry, are eclipsed by their collateral evidence; Sergei Tcherepnin, described by Lawrence Kumpf as creating a complex system of bodily configurations and social situations; Yngve Holen, whose works are read by Pablo Larios as sentient beings concerned with frustrated circulation, technological growth and associative networking; and Petrit Halilaj whose practice is framed by Elena Filipovic as rejecting pathos in favor of an intimate and critical inflection of the political.

MAIN THEME
This section, titled Post-i-Meta-Hyper-Materiality, brings together a substantial group of artists who introduce the concept of emotional and bodily alienation within the discourse dominated by the readymade, corporate art pursued by many of their digital-native peers. The elusive sculptural works of Nicholas Deshayes, Steve Bishop, Marlie Mul, Magali Reus, Ben Schumacher and Alice Channer are framed by Karen Archey as deeply engaged with materiality and production processes and imbued with bodily allusions, while also commenting on issues of abstraction, dispersion, consumption and technology. A visual essay curated by fashion futurologist Veronica So reveals how, from sculptures designed by digital simulations to edible candies formed by human body scans, the appearance of 3D printing kicks off a range of playful experiments with technology and originality. Also in this section, Alice Channer talks to Rebecca Geldard about the starting point of each work, which she describes as “a moment of material seduction”; and artists Pamela Rosenkratz and Alisa Baremboym discuss physicality versus technology and the shifting boundaries between our bodies and the external world in a cross-interview by Ruba Katrib.

MONO
Comprising an essay by Jonathan Griffin, an interview by Francesco Manacorda and a photographic portrait by Ari Marcopoulos, this issue’s MONO is devoted to the Director of the International Art Exhibition at this year’s Venice Biennale, Massimiliano Gioni. Pragmatic bordering on opportunistic throughout his adventurous career, and yet described as “a hopeless romantic” by one of his most affectionate colleagues, Gioni states that his own failure to understand is what fuels his interest in art. Generally averse to chronological or historically comprehensive presentations and departing from the tautology of the masterpiece, he is instead a proponent of Outsider and self-taught art. His exhibitions, which he defines as products of a collective intelligence, are often concerned with the position of art within our image-based society, as well as the sites of an exploration of interior worlds, dream states and psychological visions.

REGULARS
Finally, it this issue’s REGULARS, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets interview emerging artist Amalia Ulman; Gary Carrion-Murayari stages a three-way interview with Valentin Carron and Isabelle Cornaro; Felix Burrichter meets design critic Alice Rawsthorn; Leung Chi Wo, David Clarke and Lam Tung-pang engage in a round table about the art scene in Hong Kong then and now; finally, Laura McLean-Ferristraces the legacy of folk in British contemporary art from the exhibition Black Eyes and Lemonade to the practice of Jeremy Deller.

SPECIAL INSERTS
The edition is enriched by our seasonal TIPS on following, reading, listening, stopping by, meeting and visiting; as well as by three SPECIAL INSERTS, including a selection of paintings by Benjamin Senior, photographs by Jochen Lempert and collages by Sterling Ruby.

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

KALEIDOSCOPE Magazine 18 — Summer 2013

WAX Magazine 2

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures
Softcover, 128 pp., offset 4/1, 200 x 270 mm
Edition of 500
ISSN 2167-8073
Published by WAX Magazine, Inc.

$15.00 · add to cart

Featuring: Lawrence Luhring, Will Adler, Michael Marcelle, Kris Chatterson, Mercedes Maidana, Curtis Mann, John Luke, Mark Mahaney, and a free friction moment with Derek Hynd.

WAX is a bi-annual print publication exploring the intersection of art, culture and surfing in and around New York City. We believe that beauty and meaning can be found on sidewalks, boardwalks, skyscrapers and beaches alike. We’re interested in exploring the rich history of New York surfing, its beaches and residents and in finding a pathway of cultural creativity on and off the break. WAX shares the stories of area surfers who are also artists, designers, authors and auteurs. Each issue is organized around a unique theme, debuting with WAX Magazine 1, Dialogues in Spring 2012.

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

WAX Magazine 2, Structures

C Magazine 118

C Magazine 118, CriticismC Magazine 118, Criticism

C Magazine 118, Criticism
Softcover, 60 pp., offset 4/1, 210 x 295 mm
Edition of 2200
ISSN 1480-5472
Published by C Magazine

$7.50 · add to cart

Issue 118 includes feature essays by Adam Lauder on “Sensitivity Information”, Charlene Lau on “Problems in the Evaluation of Contemporary Art”, Stephen Horne on the “Doing(s) of Art Criticism”, Ben Davis on “Surviving the Crisis”, and Peta Rake on “Private Acts: Note taking in the Margins of Art Criticism”, as well as Sky Goodden in conversation with Dave Hickey.

Artist Projects include Dave Dyment’s Old Man Deciphering a Briefcase, and Charmaine Wheatley’s The Painting is Better.

Also, in this issue, reviews from across Canada and around the globe: Rose Bouthillier on Julia Dault, Jessica Bradley Annex, Toronto; Heather White on Jimmy Limit: Show Room, Clint Roenisch Gallery, Toronto; Shannon Anderson on Volume: Hear Here, Blackwood Gallery, Mississauga; Kyla Brown on Peter Dykhuis: Inventories & Micro-mapping, Red Head Gallery, Toronto; Vanessa Parent: Invisible Violence, Artspeak, Vancouver; Gloria Hickey on Philippa Jones: MIRIAD, The Rooms Provincial Art Gallery, St. John’s; Jane Affleck on Position As Desired, Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Halifax; Daniella E. Sanader on Manuela Lalic: Activisme timide, Optica, Montreal; Jill Gleesing This Will Have Been: Art, Love & Politics in the 1980’s, Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; Jen Hutton on Jordan Wolfson: Raspberry Poser, REDCAT, Los Angeles; and Michael Davidge on Robert Tombs: L’Occupation, ParisCONCRET, Paris.

C118 also includes book reviews of The Last Art College: Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, 1968-1978, review by Leah Modigliani; West of Center: Art and the Counterculture Experiment in America, 1965-1977, review by Felicity Tayler; and Work Work Work: A Reader on Art and Labour, review by Amber Landgraff.

The Electric Information Age Album

The Masses, The Electric Information Age Album

The Masses, The Electric Information Age Album
12-inch vinyl record, sleeve silkscreened/letterpress 2/1, 12.25 x 12.25 inches
Inventory Records 01 [IR01-A]
Edition of 400
Published by Inventory Books

$20.00 · add to cart

Created as an audio extension to “The Electric Information Age Book” by Jeffrey T. Schnapp and Adam Michaels, the LP was made in the spirit of the experimental 1967 “The Medium is the Massage LP”, the “first spoken arts record you can dance too” based on media theorist Marshall McLuhan’s groundbreaking book of the same name.

Produced by Schnapp, Michaels, and Daniel Perlin in a process paralleling the books production, the album incorporates new music drawing upon a wide range of genres (such as Post-Punk, Mutant Disco, Baile Funk, and Chicago Juke) with samples, quotations, and text from the Electric Information Age Book. Recorded and mixed at Perlin Studios; Mastered at Bonati Mastering; Pressed at Brooklyn Phono; Designed at Project Projects ; Letterpress Printed at Sheffield Product; Screenprinted at Haven Press.

A side: The Book of the Now; Involve US in Depth; Verbal-Visual Vernacular; In the World of Emotion; Mass Glass; Erasing Time; Page 82; Decisions; Page In.

B side: Drill Press (Dub); Page 122; Philosophical Works; Tomorrow Today; Printing Printing Printing Printing; Non-Tribal Placard; Pattern Recognition Pattern; T>E>I>A>B; Arts First Spoken Dance To; Page Out.

Digital download of 19-track album.

‘What’s the difference between this “second spoken arts record you can dance to” and its 1967 predecessor “The Medium is the Massage LP”? For all its pop fizz, the latter dangles its propositions and prepo­sitions, but seems to leave the body stumbling, fumbling for itself on the dance floor. In its labors of reworking, The Electric Information Age Album honors its predecessor while seeking to further advance its claims.’

— Jeffrey T. Schnapp

The Masses, The Electric Information Age Album

The Masses, The Electric Information Age Album

The Masses, The Electric Information Age Album

C Magazine 117

C Magazine 117, TranslationsC Magazine 117, Translations

C Magazine 117, Translations
Softcover, 60 pp., offset 4/1, 210 x 295 mm
Edition of 2200
ISSN 1480-5472
Published by C Magazine

$7.50 · add to cart

“Who has time for cynicism? If there is one role model in handling implication it is Jackie Chan…. At moments it’s all flying in his face but look at how he suddenly realigns the whole mess into a landfill art piece.”

— Hito Styerl

Issue 117 includes feature essays by Kristin Campbell, on the work of Kristiina Lahde, Diana Sherlock on the conference “Institutions by Artists,” Ania Wroblewski on the exhibition Feminism after Elles, as well as Patricia Reed in conversation with Hito Steyerl and Jacquelyn Ross in conversation with Tiziana La Melia.

Also, in this issue, reviews from across Canada and around with globe: Sean Alward: A Vertical City Goes Both Ways, Vancouver; Kika Thorne: The wildcraft, Windsor; Vanessa Maltese: Two-fold Tally, Toronto;, Archival Dialogues: Reading the Black Star Collection, Toronto; Michèle Provost: Rebranding Bytown, Ottawa; Nicolas Grenier: Proximities, Montreal; Rick Leong: The Sublimation of Self, Halifax; Hazel Meyer: Walls to the Ball, St. Johns; XTRAVAGANZA: Staging Leigh Bowery, Vienna; Roman Liška: Nu Balance, London; and A New Novel by Bjarne Melgaard, New York. C117 includes book reviews of One for Me and One to Share: Artists’ Multiples and Editions, edited by Dave Dyment and Gregory Elgstrand; Open! Key Texts, 2004–2012: Art, Culture and the Public Domain, edited by Jorinde Seijdel and Liesbeth Melis; Disturbances, by Critical Art Ensemble; and Summer of Hate, by Chris Kraus.

Artist Projects include FAG’s (Feminist Art Gallery) Faging it Forward, and Christopher Kulendran Thomas’ When Platitudes Become Form.

Frank Peter John Dick

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick
Softcover, 52 pp., offset 4/4, 230 x 300 mm
Edition of 500
ISBN 978-0-9822090-2-8
Published by Capricious

$25.00 · add to cart

K8 Hardy’s work riffs on pop culture and all the images we encounter as consumers. The art she exhibits are photographs and sculptures, but part of her process is gathering masses of images from disparate sources and obsessively collaging them together. In a sense, these collages are edits of photos torn from magazines, printed advertisements, and other visual imagery that Hardy finds compelling. Yet they also include her darkroom test strips and snapshots found at the junk store. These collages were never originally intended for exhibition or print, but merely research for the artist’s work. It was only after a few people saw them in her studio that she was encouraged to show them. For this reason, the collages are powerful and weighty; each is it’s own essay. Hardy has made visual examinations that deal with complicated ideas, issues of representation, phenomenon in style, and playful contemplations of fashion.

K8 Hardy (USA, b. 1977) is a New York-based artist who mines popular culture for material and has no regard for originality. She has no allegiance to any particular medium, but performance is a thread that weaves through her body of work. Hardy eschews virtuosity to craft and is currently exploiting photography. She believes in the power of flamboyant and bold gestures, and the conversations of play, which come across in her endeavors toward total expression. The surface is often used as a decoy in her work to address the political conditions of its production. She has recently been working on a series of photographs called the “Position Series” that employ the tropes of self-portraiture and abstract photography. Hardy is a founding member of the queer feminist journal and artist collective, LTTR. She has shown internationally at spaces including: Reena Spaulings Fine Art, NY; The Tate Modern, London; Artist Space, NY: Galerie BaliceHertling, Paris; Galerie Sonja Junkers, Munich; PS1 MOMA, NY; Higher Pictures, NY; Biennial of Photography and Visual Arts, Heerlen, NL; and the Brooklyn Museum, Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, NY.

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick

K8 Hardy, Frank Peter John Dick

Books & Co.

Ed Ruscha -- Books & Co.

Ed Ruscha — Books & Co.
March 5 — April 27, 2013
Opening: Tuesday, March 5, 6-8pm
Organized by Bob Monk

Gagosian Gallery
980 Madison Ave.
New York, NY 10075
Tuesday-Saturday 10-6pm

New York Times Preview.

Gagosian Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of Ed Ruscha’s legendary artist books together with books and works of art by more than 100 contemporary artists that respond directly and diversely to Ruscha’s original project. Organized by Bob Monk, “Ed Ruscha Books & Co.” has been drawn from private collections, including Ruscha’s own. Most of the books are installed so that viewers can interact with them and browse their pages.

Inspired by the unassuming books that he found on street stalls during a trip to Europe, in 1962 Ruscha published his first artist book, Twentysix Gasoline Stations under his own imprint, National Excelsior Press. A slim, cheaply produced volume, then priced at $3.50, Twentysix Gasoline Stations did exactly what its title suggests, reproducing twenty-six photographs of gasoline stations next to captions indicating their brand and location. All of the stations were on Route 66, the road mythologized by the eponymous TV series and in John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Ruscha’s book traveled more or less west to east, from the first service station in Los Angeles, where he moved as a young man, back to Oklahoma City, where he grew up.

Initially, the book received a poor reception, rejected by the Library of Congress for its “unorthodox form and supposed lack of information.” However, during the sixties it acquired cult status, and by the eighties it was hailed as one of the first truly modern artist’s books. Ruscha followed up Twentysix Gasoline Stations (1962) with a succession of kindred publications, including Some Los Angeles Apartments (1965), Nine Swimming Pools and a Broken Glass (1968), and Real Estate Opportunities (1970), all of which combined the literalness of early California pop art with a deadpan photographic aesthetic informed by minimalist sequence and seriality.

As the prolific and playful examples in the exhibition attest, Ruscha’s artist books have proved to be deeply influential, beginning with Bruce Nauman’s Burning Small Fires (1968), for which Nauman burned Ruscha’s Various Small Fires and Milk (1964) and photographed the process. More than forty years later, photographer Charles Johnstone relocated Ruscha’s Twentysix Gasoline Stations in Cuba, producing the portfolio Twentysix Havana Gasoline Stations (2008). The most recent homage is One Swimming Pool (2013) by Dutch artist Elisabeth Tonnard, who re-photographed one of the photographs from Ruscha’s Nine Swimming Pools and a Broken Glass (1968) and enlarged it to the size of a small swimming pool, consisting of 3164 pages the same size as the pages in Ruscha’s original book. The pages of this ‘pool on a shelf’ can be detached to create the life-size installation. Between these early and recent examples are a wealth of responses to Ruscha’s ideas by artists from all over the world, gathered here in this celebratory exhibition:

ABC Artists’ Books Cooperative, Noriko Ambe, Edgar Arceneaux, Eric Baskauskas, Luke Batten / Jonathan Sadler (New Catalogue), Erik Benjamins, Victoria Bianchetti, Doro Boehme, Jeff Brouws, Denise Scott Brown, Wendy Burton, Stephen Bush, Corinne Carlson, Dan Colen, Julie Cook, Jennifer Dalton, Bill Daniel, Claudia de la Torre, Joshua Deaner, Jen DeNike, Eric Doeringer, Stan Douglas, Harlan Erskine, Frank Eye, Kota Ezawa, Robbert Flick, Jan Freuchen, Jochen Friedrich, Thomas Galler, Anne-Valérie Gasc, Steve Giasson, Simon Goode, Oliver Griffin, Daniel S. Guy, Dejan Habicht, Marcella Hackbardt, Sebastian Hackenschmidt, Karen Henderson, Mishka Henner, Kai-Olaf Hesse, Taro Hirano, Marla Hlady, Dominik Hruza, Steven Izenour, Sveinn Fannar Jóhannsson, Taly and Russ Johnson, Charles Johnstone, Rinata Kajumova, Henning Kappenberg, Jean Keller, Shohachi Kimura, Julia Kjelgaard, Joachim Koester, Sowon Kwon, Tanja Lažetic, Gabriel Lester, Jonathan Lewis, Jochen Manz, Michael Maranda, Scott McCarney, Mark McEvoy, Jerry McMillan, Daniel Mellis, Martin Möll, Dan Monick, Jonathan Monk, Simon Morris, Audun Mortensen, Brian Murphy, Toby Mussman, Maurizio Nannucci, Bruce Nauman, John O’Brian, Stefan Oláh, Performance Re-Enactment Society, Michalis Pichler, Tadej Pogačar, Susan Porteous, James Prez, Clara Prioux, Robert Pufleb, Joseph Putrock, Jon Rafman, Achim Riechers, David John Russ, Mark Ruwedel, Tom Sachs, Joachim Schmid, Andreas Schmidt, Jean-Frédéric Schnyder, David Schoerner, Yann Sérandour, Travis Shaffer, Gordon Simpson, Paul Soulellis, Tom Sowden, Kim Stringfellow, Derek Stroup, Derek Sullivan, Yoshikazu Suzuki, Chris Svensson, Eric Tabuchi, Elisabeth Tonnard, John Tremblay, Marc Valesella, Wil Van Iersel, Louisa Van Leer, Robert Venturi, Reinhard Voigt, Alex Von Bergen, Emily Wasserman, John Waters, Henry Wessel, Keith Wilson, Charles Woodard, Theo Wujick, Mark Wyse, Hermann Zschiegner.

“Ed Ruscha Books & Co.” will coincide with the publication of MIT Press’s Various Small Books: Referencing Small Books by Ed Ruscha (2013), which documents ninety-one of the books inspired by Ruscha’s own, reproducing covers and sample layouts from each, along with a detailed description. Various Small Books also includes selections from Ruscha’s books and an appendix listing most of the known Ruscha book tributes.

Juliaan Lampens

Juliaan LampensJuliaan Lampens

Juliaan Lampens
Softcover, 152 pp., offset 4/1, 210 x 275 mm
Edition of 2000
ISBN 978-94-6117-005-7
Published by ASA Publishers

$40.00 · out of stock

The architecture of the Belgian Modernist Juliaan Lampens (b. 1926) goes beyond designs for conventional living and instead suggests a utopian avant-garde of living without barriers. He experimented with the use of raw concrete and created sculpture-like exteriors leading onto open vistas. Edited by Angelique Campens. With contributions by Angelique Campens, Sara Noel Costa De Araujo, Joseph Grima, Jan Kempenaers, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Francis Strauven.

Juliaan Lampens

Juliaan Lampens

Juliaan Lampens

Juliaan Lampens

Juliaan Lampens

Juliaan Lampens